Download Ancient Epic Poetry: Homer, Apollonius, Virgil with a by Charles Rowan Beye PDF

By Charles Rowan Beye

Charles Rowan Beye's significantly acclaimed interpretive advent to the epic poetry and poets of historical Greece, Rome, and Assyria is the following reprinted in an accelerated moment version with a brand new preface, new bankruptcy on Gilgamesh, and an Appendix of additional studying 1993-2005. for hundreds of years the beginnings of the literary heritage of the West have been outlined by means of the Hebrew Bible what most folks name the outdated testomony and Homer's epic poems, the Iliad and Odyssey. those texts have been as soon as naively alleged to have occur in perfect isolation both as a miracle of divine construction or the spontaneous combustion of the 'Greek genius'. The robust flow of phrases down over the millennia to our personal time are such a lot of generations of offspring nonetheless one way or the other beholden to their preliminary begetters.

Show description

Read or Download Ancient Epic Poetry: Homer, Apollonius, Virgil with a Chapter on the Gilgamesh Poems PDF

Similar epic books

The Power of Thetis: Allusion and Interpretation in the Iliad

Within the energy of Thetis, Laura M. Slatkin finds the total value of mythic allusion in Homeric composition and within the adventure of Homer's viewers.

The Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic: Introduction, critical edition and cuneiform texts - Volume 2

The Babylonian Gilgamesh epic is the oldest lengthy poem on the planet, with a historical past going again 4 thousand years. It tells the interesting and relocating tale of Gilgamesh's heroic deeds and lonely quest for immortality. This e-book collects for the 1st time the entire recognized resources within the unique cuneiform, together with many fragments by no means released prior to.

Homeric epic and its reception : interpretive essays

'Homeric Epic and its Reception', comprising twelve chapters - a few formerly released yet revised for this assortment, and others showing right here in print for the 1st time - deals literary interpretations of the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite. summary: Homeric Epic and its Reception, comprising twelve chapters-some formerly released yet revised for this assortment, and others showing right here in print for the 1st time-offers literary interpretations of the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite.

Additional resources for Ancient Epic Poetry: Homer, Apollonius, Virgil with a Chapter on the Gilgamesh Poems

Sample text

A remarkable fact of the tw o Homeric poem s is that they project considerably loftier concerns than the satisfaction of neighborhood domination. There survive tw o other dactylic hexam etric poem s w hich are thought to be from the oral period. These are Works and Days and Theogony (Origin of the gods) by a certain Hesiod, w h o is m uch more w illing to identify him self than is the narrator of the Iliad and the Odyssey. A lth ough it is not clear h o w contem poraneous the H esiodic poem s are, they are valuable as specim ens of som e of the other poetry that w as perhaps going from m outh to ear during that time.

G ilgam esh fails the test and prepares to depart. Utnapishtim gives him a plant of eternal youth, but a serpent steals it from him. He and his boatman sail back to Uruk. Readers will note several parallels w ith the Iliad and the Odyssey. O bviously, Enkidu is a double, a sh adow figure like Patroclus, w h ose death reminds the hero of his ow n mortality. G ilgam esh's arrogance recalls A gam em non saying that Achilles w ants everything; his strain­ ing after fame that will give him som e form of immortality echoes Achilles' anguish over life and death, w hich is the spine of the nar­ rative.

He describes the Flood. He challenges G ilgam esh to a test: stay aw ake for six days and seven nights. G ilgam esh fails the test and prepares to depart. Utnapishtim gives him a plant of eternal youth, but a serpent steals it from him. He and his boatman sail back to Uruk. Readers will note several parallels w ith the Iliad and the Odyssey. O bviously, Enkidu is a double, a sh adow figure like Patroclus, w h ose death reminds the hero of his ow n mortality. G ilgam esh's arrogance recalls A gam em non saying that Achilles w ants everything; his strain­ ing after fame that will give him som e form of immortality echoes Achilles' anguish over life and death, w hich is the spine of the nar­ rative.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.36 of 5 – based on 6 votes